Vermont Annual Report

Annual reports with the Secretary of State in Vermont are official documents that businesses are required to file each year to provide updated information about their company, such as business activities, financial status, and ownership details. These reports help ensure transparency and compliance with state regulations, as well as provide important information to stakeholders and the public.

There are 4 different ways to file an annual report in Vermont depending on your legal entity type and tax classification. Follow the guide below to help you file your annual report with the Secretary of State in Vermont or use Mosey to do it.

Use Mosey to automate annual reports in Vermont.

Vermont Annual Report for C Corporation

You must file an annual report to maintain good standing with the Secretary of State. Your annual report is due within two and a half months after the end of your business’s fiscal year.

  1. File Your Annual Report Online

    Visit the Secretary of State's Online Business Service Center and select "File your Annual/Biennial Report" from the main menu (left side of the page). Then follow prompts to confirm, update, or enter all required information.

Vermont Biennial Report for C Corporation

Nonprofit corporations doing business in Vermont must renew their nonprofit registration every two years to remain in good standing by filing a Biennial Report with the Secretary of State. Reports are due beginning the first year following initial registration between January 1 and April 1. The filing fee is $20.

  1. File Your Biennial Report

    Log in to your Online Business Service Center account and select “File your Annual/Biennial Report from the main menu to file your Biennial Report.

Vermont Annual Report for LLP

You must file an annual report to renew your business registration and maintain good standing with the Secretary of State. Your annual report is due between January 1 and April 1.

  1. File Your Annual Report Online

    Log in to your Secretary of State's Online Business Service Center account to file your Annual Report and pay the filing fees with the Vermont Secretary of State.

Vermont Annual Report for LLC

You must file an annual report to maintain good standing with the Secretary of State. Your annual report is due within three months after the end of your fiscal year.

  1. File Your Annual Report

    Visit the Secretary of State's Online Business Service Center and select "File your Annual/Biennial Report" from the main menu (left side of the page). Then follow prompts to confirm, update, or enter all required information.

What else do I need to know?

There may be additional things you will need to do to maintain your "good standing" in the state including having a registered agent and other kinds of taxes.

Maintaining a Registered Agent

Most states require that you have a registered agent that can receive important mail from the Secretary of State should they need to contact you. There are many commercial options available or you can use Mosey to be your registered agent and keep your information private in Vermont.

Other Taxes

In addition to maintaining a registered agent, maintaining your good standing can include additional taxes. This can include franchise tax, sales tax, or other state taxes. You can use Mosey to identify these additional requirements to maintain good standing in Vermont.

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