Nevada Annual Report

Annual reports with the Secretary of State in Nevada are formal documents that businesses are required to file each year to provide important information about their company, such as financial data and organizational structure. These reports help ensure transparency and compliance with state regulations, and are essential for maintaining good standing and legal status as a business entity in Nevada.

There are 3 different ways to file an annual report in Nevada depending on your legal entity type and tax classification. Follow the guide below to help you file your annual report with the Secretary of State in Nevada or use Mosey to do it.

Use Mosey to automate annual reports in Nevada.

Nevada Annual Report and Business License Renewal for LLC, LLP

Businesses are required to file an annual report and renew their business license by filing the Annual List of Officers, Directors and State Business License Application (Form 100103). This is the same form that accompanied registering your business in Nevada for the first time. All fees and the renewal forms are due on the last day of the anniversary month in which the license was originally filed.

  1. File Annual Report Online

    File your business's annual report and pay renewal fees online using SilverFlume.

Nevada Annual Report and Business License Renewal for C Corporation

Corporations are required to file an annual report and renew their business license by filing the Annual List of Officers, Directors and State Business License Application (Form 100103). This is the same form that accompanied the Qualification to do Business you originally filed when registering in Nevada for the first time. The renewal forms are due on the last day of the anniversary month in which the license was originally filed.

  1. File Annual Report Online

    File your business's annual report and pay renewal fees online using SilverFlume.

Nevada Annual Report and Business License Renewal for C Corporation

Nonprofit organizations are required to file an annual report and renew their business license by filing the Annual List of Officers, Directors and State Business License Application (Form 100103). This is the same form that accompanied the Qualification to do Business you originally filed when registering in Nevada for the first time. The renewal forms are due on the last day of the anniversary month in which the license was originally filed. Note: You are required to submit a Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement or an Exemption From Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement with your renewal each year. Organizations may qualify for filing the exemption if they: (a) Solicit from fewer than 15 people annually, (b) Solicit only from individuals closely related to the organization's officers, directors, trustees, or executive personnel, or (c) Recognized as a church under the Internal Revenue Code 501(c)(3).

  1. File Annual Reports Online

    File your Annual List of Officers, Directors and State Business License Application (Form 100103), Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement or an Exemption From Charitable Solicitation Registration Statement, and pay renewal fees online using SilverFlume.

What else do I need to know?

There may be additional things you will need to do to maintain your "good standing" in the state including having a registered agent and other kinds of taxes.

Maintaining a Registered Agent

Most states require that you have a registered agent that can receive important mail from the Secretary of State should they need to contact you. There are many commercial options available or you can use Mosey to be your registered agent and keep your information private in Nevada.

Other Taxes

In addition to maintaining a registered agent, maintaining your good standing can include additional taxes. This can include franchise tax, sales tax, or other state taxes. You can use Mosey to identify these additional requirements to maintain good standing in Nevada.

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