Nebraska Foreign Qualification

Foreign qualification with the Secretary of State in Nebraska refers to the process by which a business entity formed in another state seeks permission to conduct business in Nebraska. This legal requirement ensures that the business complies with local regulations and can operate within the state while maintaining its status as a foreign entity.

There are 2 different ways to foreign qualify in Nebraska depending on your legal entity type and tax classification. Follow the guide below to help you register with the Secretary of State in Nebraska or use Mosey to do it.

Use Mosey to register with the Secretary of State in Nebraska.

Nebraska Foreign Registration for C Corporation

If you are "transacting business" in Nebraska, you must obtain a Certificate of Authority to Transact Business from the Nebraska Secretary of State. Nebraska has a non-exhaustive list of activities that do not constitute "transacting business" in the state.

  1. Establish a Registered Agent

    Maintain a registered agent in Nebraska. The registered agent can have a Nebraska street address (a post office box number may be provided in addition to the street address), reside in Nebraska, or be a corporation authorized to transact business in Nebraska.

  2. Obtain Certificate of Good Standing

    A corporation must provide a Certificate of Good Standing, or similar document, authenticated by the Secretary of State or other official in the home state. This must be issued within the last 60 days. Note: A certified copy of the articles of incorporation is not acceptable.

  3. File for a Certificate of Authority to Transact Business

    Electronically file your application for a Certificate of Authority to Transact Business.

Nebraska Foreign Registration for LLC

If you are "transacting business" in Nebraska, you must obtain a Certificate of Authority to Transact Business from the Nebraska Secretary of State. Nebraska has a non-exhaustive list of activities that do not constitute "transacting business" in the state.

  1. Obtain Certificate of Good Standing

    You must provide a Certificate of Good Standing, or similar document, authenticated by the Secretary of State or other official in your home state. This must be issued within the last 60 days. Note: A certified copy of the articles of incorporation is not acceptable.

  2. Establish a Registered Agent

    Establish and maintain a registered agent in Nebraska. The registered agent must have a Nebraska street address (a post office box number may be provided in addition to the street address), be an individual who resides in Nebraska, or a business authorized to transact business in Nebraska.

  3. File for a Certificate of Authority to Transact Business

    Electronically file your application for a Certificate of Authority to Transact Business.

What else do I need to know?

Once you are registered with the Secretary of State, you may have additional requirements to maintain your "good standing" in the state. Failing to do so can result in fines, back taxes, and forfeiting certain priveleges within the state.

Maintaining a Registered Agent

Most states require that you have a registered agent that can receive important mail from the Secretary of State should they need to contact you. There are many commercial options available or you can use Mosey to be your registered agent and keep your information private in Nebraska.

Annual Reports and Taxes

In addition to maintaining a registered agent, most states require you to file a report annually. Registration can also trigger state taxes such as a franchise tax or income tax. You can use Mosey to identify these additional requirements to maintain good standing in Nebraska.

Review your compliance risks, free.

More from the blog

Learn how to keep your business compliant in all 50 states across payroll, HR, Secretary of State, and tax.

What Is SUI? State Unemployment Insurance FAQs

If you’re a stakeholder in HR, finance, or even the founder of a small to mid-sized company, you already know state compliance can get tricky, especially when it comes to fluctuating tax rates. With that in mind, let’s discuss state unemployment insurance, commonly abbreviated SUI. What Is SUI? State unemployment insurance, or SUI, is an employer-funded tax designed to provide short-term financial support to employees who have been laid off or terminated without misconduct.

Kaitlin Edwards | Nov 5, 2023

What Is Business Privilege Tax? Mercantile Tax FAQs

Business privilege and mercantile tax (BPM) is a tax assessed on the gross receipts of specific types of businesses, commonly retailers and wholesalers. Originating from the Pennsylvania Local Tax Enabling Act of 1965, this tax serves as compensation for businesses availing local governmental services, such as public safety measures. BPM has undergone multiple changes since 1965. By 1988, the Pennsylvania Local Tax Reform Commission labeled it as a “nuisance tax,” primarily due to inadequacies in the legislative framework and vagueness surrounding the tax base.

Gabrielle Sinacola | Jan 9, 2024

Employee vs. Contractor: Understanding the Difference

Contractor work arrangements are popular. According to the US Government Accountability Office, about one-third of all businesses and almost 90% of Fortune 500 companies use independent contractors in some capacity. Hiring contractors can be a particularly attractive option for early-stage businesses because it allows them to leverage specialized skill sets while building their internal teams. But contractors are very different from employees, and the two mustn’t be conflated—or hefty penalties can apply.

Gabrielle Sinacola | Aug 8, 2023

Ready to get started?

Sign up now or schedule a free consultation to see how Mosey transforms business compliance.