Connecticut Foreign Qualification

Foreign qualification with the Secretary of State in Connecticut refers to the process by which a business entity that was originally formed in another state seeks permission to operate in Connecticut. This legal requirement ensures that the business complies with the state's regulations and can conduct its operations within Connecticut's jurisdiction.

There are 2 different ways to foreign qualify in Connecticut depending on your legal entity type and tax classification. Follow the guide below to help you register with the Secretary of State in Connecticut or use Mosey to do it.

Use Mosey to register with the Secretary of State in Connecticut.

Connecticut Foreign Registration for C Corporation

If you are "transacting business" in Connecticut, you must obtain a Certificate of Authority from the Connecticut Secretary of State. Connecticut has a non-exhaustive list of activities that do not constitute "transacting business" in the state. The name of the foreign corporation must contain word or words of corporate designation.

  1. Create a CT.gov Account

    Register an account on CT.gov to be able to electronically file for a Certificate of Authority.

  2. Obtain Certificate of Good Standing

    Get a Certificate of Good Standing from your home state, issued within the last 90 days.

  3. Establish a Registered Agent

    Connecticut law requires foreign businesses to continuously maintain a registered office (that may be the same as its place of business) and a registered agent. The agent may be any resident of Connecticut, a corporation formed in the state, or foreign entities who have received a Certificate of Authority in Connecticut, as well as the Secretary of State.

  4. File for a Certificate of Authority

    Login to CT.gov to electronically file your application for a Certificate of Authority.

Connecticut Foreign Registration for LLC

If you are "transacting business" in Connecticut, you must file a Foreign Registration Statement with the Connecticut Secretary of State. Connecticut has a non-exhaustive list of activities that do not constitute "transacting business" in the state. The name of the foreign limited liability company must contain word or words of LLC designation.

  1. Create a CT.gov Account

    Register an account on CT.gov to be able to electronically file for a Certificate of Authority.

  2. Obtain Certificate of Good Standing

    Get a Certificate of Good Standing from your home state, issued within the last 90 days.

  3. Establish a Registered Agent

    Connecticut law requires foreign businesses to continuously maintain a registered office (that may be the same as its place of business) and a registered agent. The agent may be any resident of Connecticut, a corporation formed in the state, or foreign entities who have received a Certificate of Authority in Connecticut, as well as the Secretary of State.

  4. File Your Foreign Registration Statement

    Login to CT.gov to electronically file your Foreign Registration Statement.

What else do I need to know?

Once you are registered with the Secretary of State, you may have additional requirements to maintain your "good standing" in the state. Failing to do so can result in fines, back taxes, and forfeiting certain priveleges within the state.

Maintaining a Registered Agent

Most states require that you have a registered agent that can receive important mail from the Secretary of State should they need to contact you. There are many commercial options available or you can use Mosey to be your registered agent and keep your information private in Connecticut.

Annual Reports and Taxes

In addition to maintaining a registered agent, most states require you to file a report annually. Registration can also trigger state taxes such as a franchise tax or income tax. You can use Mosey to identify these additional requirements to maintain good standing in Connecticut.

Review your compliance risks, free.

More from the blog

Learn how to keep your business compliant in all 50 states across payroll, HR, Secretary of State, and tax.

How to Change Registered Agents in 3 Easy Steps

Maintaining a registered agent in every state where you’re registered with the Secretary of State is a key compliance requirement—and to avoid fines or other penalties against your business, each agent needs to be able to reliably receive and forward correspondence. If one of your registered agents can’t perform these functions (or if your business needs change), your business can change registered agents by filing a statement with the relevant Secretary of State.

Gabrielle Sinacola | Jul 25, 2023

Workers Compensation Laws State by State (2024)

Workers’ compensation laws are there to protect both businesses and their employees. Knowing the laws is essential, whether you’re an employer ensuring coverage for your team or an employee who wants to know your rights in case of a workplace injury or illness. It’s important to note that these laws differ significantly from state to state and can change over time. Failing to stay compliant could bring severe financial and legal consequences for your business.

Gabrielle Sinacola | Jul 7, 2024

What Is an Employer of Record: ERO Types and Benefits

Regarding business expansion and global talent acquisition, the term “Employer of Record” (EOR) is becoming increasingly widespread. However, what exactly does it mean? At its core, an EOR is a game-changer for businesses looking to stretch their operational borders without getting entangled in the web of international employment laws. EOR basically handles all the fine details of employment so you can shine in the global market. By partnering with an EOR, companies can easily hire across borders, tapping into a global talent pool that was once beyond reach.

Alex Kehayias | Apr 14, 2024

Ready to get started?

Sign up now or schedule a free consultation to see how Mosey transforms business compliance.