California Annual Report

Annual reports filed with the Secretary of State in California are formal documents that provide important information about a business's activities, financial performance, and ownership structure. These reports are required by law and serve as a way for businesses to maintain transparency and compliance with state regulations.

There are 2 different ways to file an annual report in California depending on your legal entity type and tax classification. Follow the guide below to help you file your annual report with the Secretary of State in California or use Mosey to do it.

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California Biennial Statement of Information for LLC

To maintain good standing in California, you must file a Statement of Information to the Secretary of State every other year. Limited liability companies initially registered in an odd year are required to file every odd year, and vice versa. You can file during a six-month filing window ending on the last day of your registration anniversary month.

  1. File Statement of Information Online

    Visit the Secretary of State bizfile Online page, enter your entity name in the search box, then click "Request Access" to sign in. After that, navigate to your entity name under "My Records" and click "File Statement of Information" on the sidebar.

California Annual Statement of Information for C Corporation

To maintain good standing in California, you must file a Statement of Information to the Secretary of State every year. You can file during a six-month filing window ending on the last day of your registration anniversary month.

  1. File Statement of Information Online

    Visit the Secretary of State bizfile Online page, enter your corporation name in the search box, then click "Request Access" to sign in. After that, navigate to your corporation name under "My Records" and click "File Statement of Information" on the sidebar.

What else do I need to know?

There may be additional things you will need to do to maintain your "good standing" in the state including having a registered agent and other kinds of taxes.

Maintaining a Registered Agent

Most states require that you have a registered agent that can receive important mail from the Secretary of State should they need to contact you. There are many commercial options available or you can use Mosey to be your registered agent and keep your information private in California.

Other Taxes

In addition to maintaining a registered agent, maintaining your good standing can include additional taxes. This can include franchise tax, sales tax, or other state taxes. You can use Mosey to identify these additional requirements to maintain good standing in California.

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