Arizona Foreign Qualification

Foreign qualification with the Secretary of State in Arizona refers to the process by which a business entity formed in another state or country seeks permission to conduct business in Arizona. This involves registering with the Secretary of State and fulfilling certain legal requirements to ensure compliance with local regulations.

There are 2 different ways to foreign qualify in Arizona depending on your legal entity type and tax classification. Follow the guide below to help you register with the Secretary of State in Arizona or use Mosey to do it.

Use Mosey to register with the Secretary of State in Arizona.

Arizona Foreign Qualification for LLC

Before "doing business" in Arizona, a foreign limited liability company must be granted the authority to do so. Arizona does not provide a clear definition of what "doing business" means, but they do outline a list of activities that do not qualify.

  1. Register on Arizona's eCorp Website

    Make an account on the ecorp.azcc.gov website.

  2. Register a Statutory Agent

    File the Statutory Agent Acceptance (Form M002) to register your statutory agent with the Arizona Corporation Commission. During registration an email will be sent to your statutory agent, who must accept within seven days of filing.

  3. Obtain Incorporation Documents

    At the time of filing, a foreign limited liability company must also provide a copy of their Articles of Incorporation, any amendments to the Articles of Incorporation, and a certificate of existence or a document of similar import authorized by the Secretary of State. These must be certified copies dated no more than 60 days ago.

  4. File Application for Authority to Transact Business

    Log into the eCorp website and click on "Online Services" followed by "File as a Foreign Entity" to start the online application process for the Authority to Transact Business (Form L025).

Arizona Foreign Qualification for C Corporation

Before "doing business" in Arizona, a foreign corporation must be granted the authority to do so. Arizona does not provide a clear definition of what "doing business" means, but they do outline a list of activities that do not qualify.

  1. Register on Arizona's eCorp Website

    Make an account on the ecorp.azcc.gov website.

  2. File Certificate of Disclosure

    Foreign corporations must file Certificate of Disclosure (Form C003). Log into the eCorp website to complete this step.

  3. Register a Statutory Agent

    File the Statutory Agent Acceptance (Form M002) to register your statutory agent with the Arizona Corporation Commission. During registration an email will be sent to your statutory agent, who must accept within seven days of filing.

  4. Obtain Incorporation Documents

    At the time of filing, a foreign corporation must also provide a copy of their Articles of Incorporation, any amendments to the Articles of Incorporation, and a certificate of existence or a document of similar import authorized by the Secretary of State. These must be certified copies dated no more than 60 days ago.

  5. File Application for Authority to Transact Business

    Log into the eCorp website and click on "Online Services" followed by "File as a Foreign Entity" to start the online application process for the Authority to Transact Business (Form C018).

  6. Publish Application for Authority

    Within 60 days of approval, you must publish a copy of your Application for Authority in an Arizona publication. The specific requirements regarding the publication will be detailed in the application for authority approval letter that the corporation will receive from the Arizona Corporation Commission.

What else do I need to know?

Once you are registered with the Secretary of State, you may have additional requirements to maintain your "good standing" in the state. Failing to do so can result in fines, back taxes, and forfeiting certain priveleges within the state.

Maintaining a Registered Agent

Most states require that you have a registered agent that can receive important mail from the Secretary of State should they need to contact you. There are many commercial options available or you can use Mosey to be your registered agent and keep your information private in Arizona.

Annual Reports and Taxes

In addition to maintaining a registered agent, most states require you to file a report annually. Registration can also trigger state taxes such as a franchise tax or income tax. You can use Mosey to identify these additional requirements to maintain good standing in Arizona.

Review your compliance risks, free.

More from the blog

Learn how to keep your business compliant in all 50 states across payroll, HR, Secretary of State, and tax.

SOC 2 Compliance Checklist 2024

Data seems to drive everything these days. In business, it’s responsible for safeguarding your customers’ information — it can be the difference between building trust and facing damaging consequences. SOC 2 compliance is a widely recognized standard that demonstrates your organization’s commitment to protecting sensitive data. It’s not just a box to tick — it’s a way to ensure your business practices align with the highest security standards. Achieving SOC 2 compliance doesn’t have to be a headache for your business.

Kaitlin Edwards | Jun 8, 2024

Do I Need a Business License? Requirements Explained

There are many rules and regulations that dictate how, where, and when a business can legally operate. Business licenses can be a nuanced issue to navigate, specifically because requirements can vary significantly from region to region. If you are an entrepreneur and are doing business as a startup, or are a small business in your town, here’s what you need to know about business license requirements and the steps you must take to legitimately operate your business in compliance with local law.

Alex Kehayias | Feb 11, 2024

Workers Compensation Laws State by State (2024)

Workers’ compensation laws are there to protect both businesses and their employees. Knowing the laws is essential, whether you’re an employer ensuring coverage for your team or an employee who wants to know your rights in case of a workplace injury or illness. It’s important to note that these laws differ significantly from state to state and can change over time. Failing to stay compliant could bring severe financial and legal consequences for your business.

Gabrielle Sinacola | Jul 7, 2024

Ready to get started?

Sign up now or schedule a free consultation to see how Mosey transforms business compliance.